What are the various sentiments of opposition to war or specifically the Vietnam War contained in the lyrics of protest songs of the 1960s?

Analyze the Evidence
Question
What are the various sentiments of opposition to war or specifically the Vietnam War contained in the lyrics of protest songs of the 1960s?
Identify 4 sentiments of opposition to the war and cite phrases from the lyrics of these songs. (Note: It will be helpful to you if you locate these songs on YouTube and listen to the music as you read the lyrics.)
Concept and Evidence Chart
Sentiments of Opposition                                    Lyric Citations
 

 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 

Background
In the United States, music has been a vehicle for protest going back to the 18th century. The American folk music tradition is replete with songs that have criticized and spoken up against powerful men, women, and institutions in American politics. In the 1920s and 30s, the blues music tradition joined folk music as a major conduit for protest and commentary on American society. Labor and social activism were the causes that inspired the protest music of the 1930s into the early 1950s.
In the later 1950s much of this protest focused on two phenomena — the growing civil rights movement and the anti-nuclear war movement. But increasingly, the object of protest in the 1960s was the Vietnam War. As President Kennedy sent “advisors” to Vietnam in the early 1960s and President Johnson escalated the war in 1964, the protest tradition found a new music genre–rock music.
The pivotal figure was probably Bob Dylan, who wrote several anti-war songs in about a 20-month period from late 1962 to early 1964, including a song called “Masters of War.” “Masters of War” was clearly in the folk tradition, as Dylan wrote for the acoustic guitar at the time. But many of his folk standards were being played by rock bands. Also, Dylan viewed “Masters of War” as a protest of the “military-industrial complex” that President Eisenhower talked about at the end of his presidency, not the Vietnam War. Nevertheless, the public perceived “Masters of War” and other anti-war songs as anti-Vietnam War songs.
The year 1966 was a key year since Johnson’s escalation of the Vietnam War was beginning to be felt at home in the debate about the war, the draft, and the country’s national debt. Numerous rock bands and songwriters began to question aspects of the war. The number of protest songs increased significantly in the following years, but the messages had many different calls to action or expression of sentiments about Vietnam.

Source 1: Bob Dylan, “Masters of War” (1963)
Come you masters of warYou that build all the gunsYou that build the death planesYou that build all the bombsYou that hide behind wallsYou that hide behind desksI just want you to knowI can see through your masks.
You that never done nothin’But build to destroyYou play with my worldLike it’s your little toyYou put a gun in my handAnd you hide from my eyesAnd you turn and run fartherWhen the fast bullets fly.
Like Judas of oldYou lie and deceiveA world war can be wonYou want me to believeBut I see through your eyesAnd I see through your brainLike I see through the waterThat runs down my drain.
You fasten all the triggersFor the others to fireThen you set back and watchWhen the death count gets higherYou hide in your mansion’As young people’s bloodFlows out of their bodiesAnd is buried in the mud.
You’ve thrown the worst fearThat can ever be hurledFear to bring childrenInto the worldFor threatening my babyUnborn and unnamedYou ain’t worth the bloodThat runs in your veins.
How much do I knowTo talk out of turnYou might say that I’m youngYou might say I’m unlearnedBut there’s one thing I knowThough I’m younger than youThat even Jesus would neverForgive what you do.
Let me ask you one questionIs your money that goodWill it buy you forgivenessDo you think that it couldI think you will findWhen your death takes its tollAll the money you madeWill never buy back your soul.
And I hope that you dieAnd your death’ll come soonI will follow your casketIn the pale afternoonAnd I’ll watch while you’re loweredDown to your deathbedAnd I’ll stand over your grave ‘Til I’m sure that you’re dead.
Source 2: Paul Simon, “Scarborough Fair” (1966)
Are you going to Scarborough Fair?Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thymeRemember me to one who lives thereShe once was a true love of mine.
Tell her to make me a cambric shirt(On the side of a hill in the deep forest green)Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme(Tracing a sparrow on snow-crested ground)Without no seams nor needlework(Blankets and bedclothes the child of the mountain)Then she’ll be a true love of mine(Sleeps unaware of the clarion call).
Tell her to find me an acre of land(On the side of a hill, a sprinkling of leaves)Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme(Washes the ground with so many tears)Between the salt water and the sea strand(A soldier cleans and polishes a gun)Then she’ll be a true love of mine.
Tell her to reap it in a sickle of leather(War bellows, blazing in scarlet battalions)Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme(Generals order their soldiers to kill)And to gather it all in a bunch of heather(And to fight for a cause they’ve long ago forgotten)Then she’ll be a true love of mine.
Are you going to Scarborough Fair?Parsley, sage, rosemary, and thymeRemember me to one who lives thereShe once was a true love of mine
Source 3: Country Joe McDonald and the Fish, “I-Feel-Like-I’m-Fixing-To-Die Rag” (1966)
Well, come on all of you, big strong men,Uncle Sam needs your help again.Yeah, he’s got himself in a terrible jamWay down yonder in VietnamSo put down your books and pick up a gun,Gonna have a whole lotta fun.
And it’s one, two, three,What are we fighting for ?Don’t ask me, I don’t give a damn,Next stop is Vietnam;And it’s five, six, seven,Open up the pearly gates,Well there ain’t no time to wonder why,Whoopee! we’re all gonna die.
Yeah, come on Wall Street, don’t be slow,Why man, this is war au-go-goThere’s plenty good money to be madeBy supplying the Army with the tools of its trade,Just hope and pray that if they drop the bomb,They drop it on the Viet Cong.
And it’s one, two, three,What are we fighting for ?Don’t ask me, I don’t give a damn,Next stop is Vietnam.And it’s five, six, seven,Open up the pearly gates,Well there ain’t no time to wonder whyWhoopee! we’re all gonna die.
Well, come on generals, let’s move fast;Your big chance has come at last.Now you can go out and get those reds‘Cause the only good commie is the one that’s deadAnd you know that peace can only be wonWhen we’ve blown ’em all to kingdom come.
And it’s one, two, three,What are we fighting for?Don’t ask me, I don’t give a damn,Next stop is Vietnam;And it’s five, six, seven,Open up the pearly gates,Well there ain’t no time to wonder whyWhoopee! we’re all gonna die.
Come on mothers throughout the land,Pack your boys off to Vietnam.Come on fathers, and don’t hesitateTo send your sons off before it’s too late.You can be the first ones in your blockTo have your boy come home in a box.
And it’s one, two, threeWhat are we fighting for?Don’t ask me, I don’t give a damn,Next stop is Vietnam.And it’s five, six, seven,Open up the pearly gates,Well there ain’t no time to wonder why,Whoopee! we’re all gonna die.
Source 4: Buffalo Springfield, “For What Its Worth” (1966)
There’s somethin’ happenin’ hereWhat it is ain’t exactly clearThere’s a man with a gun over thereA tellin’ me, I got to beware.I think it’s time we stop, children, what’s that sound?Everybody look what’s going down
There’s battle lines being drawnNobody’s right if everybody’s wrongYoung people speakin’ their mindsA gettin’ so much resistance from behind.Time we stop, hey, what’s that sound?Everybody look what’s going down.
What a field day for the heatA thousand people in the streetSinging songs and they carrying signsMostly say, hooray for our sideIt’s time we stop, hey, what’s that sound?Everybody look what’s going down.
Paranoia strikes deepInto your life it will creepIt starts when you’re always afraidStep out of line, the man come and take you awayWe better stop, hey, what’s that sound? Everybody look what’s going down.
Source 5: Jefferson Airplane, “Volunteers” (1969)
Look what’s happening out in the streetsGot a revolution, got to revolutionHey, I’m dancing down the streetsGot a revolution, got to revolutionAin’t it amazing all the people I meet?Got a revolution, got to revolution
One generation got oldOne generation got soulThis generation got no destination to holdPick up the cry
Hey, now it’s time for you and meGot a revolution, got to revolutionCome on, now we’re marching to the seaGot a revolution, got to revolution
Who will take it from you?We will and who are we?
We are volunteers of AmericaVolunteers of AmericaVolunteers of AmericaVolunteers of America
Got a revolution Whoa, got a revolution
Source 6: Creedence Clearwater Revival, “Fortunate Son” (1969)
Some folks are born made to wave the flagOoh, they’re red, white and blueAnd when the band plays “Hail to the Chief”Oh, they point the cannon at you, Lord.
It ain’t me, it ain’t meI ain’t no Senator’s sonIt ain’t me, it ain’t meI ain’t no fortunate one, no.
Some folks are born silver spoon in handLord, don’t they help themselves, ohBut when the tax men come to the doorLord, the house look a like a rummage sale, yes.
It ain’t me, it ain’t meI ain’t no millionaire’s son, no, noIt ain’t me, it ain’t meI ain’t no fortunate one, no.
Yeah, some folks inherit star spangled eyesOoh, they send you down to war, LordAnd when you ask them, “How much should we give?”Oh, they only answer, more, more, more, oh.
It ain’t me, it ain’t meI ain’t no military sonIt ain’t me, it ain’t meI ain’t no fortunate one.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Date
Time
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Assignment 1
Fri, 7 December 2018
5:00 pm
6%
Assignment 2
Fri, 29 March 2019
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PURPOSETo be successful in the workforce and as an economist, you need to be able to critically evaluateeconomic arguments and convey your reasoning to a “general audience” in writing. Theassignments in this class will help you develop these skills. You will need to demonstrate yourability to apply economic concepts and tools to different, more open- ended contexts. This alsohelps you learn to apply and to view events through the lens of economics.TASKThis is an individual writing assignment. There will be two writing assignments for this course togive you practice and opportunities to get feedback on your writing. These are the generalinstructions for both assignments.For both assignments, you are to write a750 word critical analysis of an article. You will be gradedon the quality and thoroughness of your analysis. Writing skills are essential to enable you tocommunicate your ideas to others. Therefore, you will also be graded on the clarity, flow andoverall cohesiveness of the writing in your paper. The rubric we shall use (the marks you can earnfor each desirable skill demonstrated) is posted on the course website.What does it mean to be critical in Economics?Writing a critical analysis requires the following steps:1. Translating a written argument into a form that can be analyzed using the tools we havelearned in class.2. Using economic tools to critically examine the argument being made.Analysis involvesdoing more than merely paraphrasing the textbook, class notes or using jargon.Itinvolves the following:a. identifying the appropriate model or tool for the context;b. checking to see if the model’s underlying required assumptions are sufficientlysatisfied; and2 of 6 PagesECO200: WA Instructions: FW 2018-2019c. identifying important differences between the model and the real-world context,and identifying how these differences affect qualitative and quantitativepredictions.3. Comparing your analysis with the author’s arguments and articulating any differences orsimilarities in a precise manner.4. Translating all of this into clear language that readers can easily understand.N.B. The Critical Analysis is NOT a research paper per se. While you may find it helpful toconsult outside resources, it is not necessary to do so, and it is entirely possible to earn full markswithout doing so.The primary metric upon which we judge your analysis is your ability tothoughtfully apply ECO200 tools in analyzing the real-world applications.ORGANIZATION, STRUCTURE and FORMATHow to structure your assignment1. Introduction: Set up a thesis statement in which you briefly identify and summarize thepoint(s) you will make.2. Main body: The next part should provide your analysis of the article’s argument(s). Youranalysis should use economic concepts you have learned in class.Remember, narrow your focus so that your analysis can be more in-depth. Indepth analysis is much more important than hitting every point made in thearticle.3. Conclusion: Briefly draw the evaluation together in a short concluding paragraph.NOTE: Any references you cite should be identified and listed at the end of the paper. They donot count toward the word limit. The article to analyzemust be included in your reference list.LengthYour assignment should have a maximum of 750 words (excluding the title page and thereference list). Given the required format below, 750 words is approximately three pages.As 750 words is not a lot, you need to seriously limit the space you devote to summarizing thearticle. You should assume that your reader has read the article, even if she has not (yet)critically thought about it.Appropriate AudienceYou are writing for the general reading population. This means you will need to explain yourarguments in a way that someone who has some understanding of basic economic concepts, butnot detailed knowledge, can understand it.A good guideline: assume a reader who has taken ECO100 a few years ago. She will understandbasic ECO101 Micro concepts, but will have certainly forgotten most of the subtleties and manyof the implications.3 of 6 PagesECO200: WA Instructions: FW 2018-2019How to format your assignmentTo earn full marks, you must do the following: Your assignment must be typed, double-spaced and have a font size of at least 12 pointsin Times New Roman. Put the word count of your assignment in parentheses at the end. For example, “(750words)” The title page should have your full name, student id number and the class information(i.e., ECO200, FW 2017-2018). The file you submit must be a PDF document. Files must be named FamilyName_GivenName_ECO200_1 for the first assignment andFamilyName _ GivenName _ECO200_2 for the second assignment, where FamilyNameis your family name and GivenName is your given name.If you fail to follow the instructions regarding the format of your assignment, there will bedeductions. See PENALTIES below for more details.LOGISTICS Submit each assignment online to Quercus. To submit your assignment, follow these instructionso In “Assignments” click the item titled “Writing Assignment” to submitassignment #1. For Writing Assignment #2, click the item “Writing Assignment2”.o Follow the file naming guidelines above.o Uploaded files should not include special characters in the file name for example,# ! % ?. Do not attach multiple files with the same name. Your assignment will be graded according to a Rubric. The Rubric will be posted in theWriting Assignments folder in the “Files” section of the Quercus webpage.CRITICAL ANALYSIS We are looking for a critical analysis. Perhaps the biggest mistake you can make issubmitting a writing assignment that is largely a summary of the assigned article. Depth is preferred to breadth. The student providing a strong analysis of two relevantpoints will earn much higher marks than the student identifying a number of pointswithout fully analyzing any of them.1 We define critical rather broadly. It is certainly possible to write an excellent criticalanalysis in which you agree with the author of the article. Likewise, you should not feelshy about disagreeing with an author. In either case, the strength of your analysis willdepend on your ability to thoughtfully apply ECO200 tools.1 In preparing your analysis, we hope you identify a number of points you can make. We understand that it can bedifficult to leave out a point you have spent time thinking about and developing. If you find yourself in thissituation, please consider something along the following lines: “While the author’s argument certainly does rely onassumingX, in this analysis I focus on Y and Z, and argue that . . .”4 of 6 PagesECO200: WA Instructions: FW 2018-2019 You must submit your assignment through the Quercus website. See above for logisticsof how to do so.Don’t be late – there are penalties!Getting Started To evaluate the article, you need to first understand the author’s arguments. Start byidentifying the assumptions inherent in the argument, checking to see if the conclusionsfollow from these assumptions. Try to distinguish the argument from the evidenceprovided to support the argument. To do critical evaluation, essentially you should take apart the various steps in theargument and see if they make sense separately and as a whole. Can you use the toolslearned in class to think about the argument in another way? Check to see if the author ismissing anything in her argument or has used some tool or method incorrectly orinappropriately. Is there evidence that contradicts the author’s argument?Refer to theChicago Manual of Style for advice on how to write up your references. It isavailable athttp://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.htmlPENALTIES You will receive a 10 percentage point penalty (5 marks)2 for submitting an assignmentafter the deadline, and an additional 10 percentage point penalty assessed every 24 hours.For example:o An assignment submitted at 5:00:13 PM (thirteen seconds after 5:00 PM) on thedue date will receive a 10 percentage point penalty.o An assignment submitted 25 hours late will receive a 20 percentage point penalty. No extensions will be granted under any circumstance (e.g., illness, computer problems,etc.). We will deduct 1 mark (2%) if you fail to show the word count, exceed the word count,submit an unacceptable file format (other than PDF), use an improper file name, choosethe wrong font, etc. For each additional failure, we will deduct 2 marks (4%). For example, 3 breaches willincur a penalty of 1 + 2 + 2 = 5 marks (10%). Be aware that there is no cap on the total penalty.In sum, be careful; don’t lose marks for inattention to these requirements!ACADEMIC INTEGRITY AND TURNITIN.COMThe Department of Economics takes incidents of plagiarism very seriously and prosecutes themvigorously. Not knowing what constitutes plagiarism is not a defense.2 Your WA will be graded out of 50 marks, according to a Grading Rubric. The Rubric has been posted in aseparate document.5 of 6 PagesECO200: WA Instructions: FW 2018-2019The University policy on academic integrity can be found at:www.academicintegrity.utoronto.ca/ where you will find details about what constitutesplagiarism and how to avoid it.The University disclaimer on Turnitin.com follows:“Normally, students will be required to submit their course essays to Turnitin.com for areview of textual similarity and detection of possible plagiarism. In doing so, students willallow their essays to be included as source documents in the Turnitin.com referencedatabase, where they will be used solely for the purpose of detecting plagiarism. The termsthat apply to the University’s use of the Turnitin.com service are described on theTurnitin.com web site.”You are free to refuse to submit your work through Turnitin.com. You must so declare by thedate shown in the course syllabus. If you decide that you do not feel comfortable using the site,you must then make special arrangements with your instructor no later than two weeks before theassignment’s due date. We will ask you to submit all your rough work, including notes and draftversions of your assignment. You may also be requested to meet with a TA or the instructor todiscuss your paper.WRITING TUTORIALSPrior to each assignment’s submission date, there will be a writing tutorial. (Times and locationsfor each section of ECO 200 will be announced in lecture and on the course website.)In the first tutorial, you will participate in exercises structured to give you practice in criticalanalysis. In the second tutorial, it is likely you will analyze a WA#1 submission to assess itsstrengths and weaknesses. You can earn up to 2 marks (4%) in your writing assignment byattending, participating and completing the writing tutorial’s activity.WRITING TIPSSome essential writing tips3: Use simple, clear language. Avoid metaphors, flowery speech4 or jargon. Do not use the passive voice (The box was held by John) when the active voice is anoption (John held the box). Keep your sentences short. Make sure your paragraphs are self-contained and coherent: put only one main idea ineach paragraph. Avoid too long (more than 1/3 of a page) or too short (one or twosentences only) paragraphs. Make your main point early on, and make sure that everything you write serves tosupport your main point (even your counter-arguments serve to support your main point).3 From Jessie Lamontagne and Andrea Williams.4 For example: “Since the dawn of time, economists have contemplated . . .”6 of 6 PagesECO200: WA Instructions: FW 2018-2019 Support each argument with evidence, such as a statistic, example or economicreasoning. Make clear the economic concepts and reasoning on which your argument is based. Be respectful of arguments that differ from yours: you can be critical without dismissingthe work of others. Consider your audience. Use everyday words, define more technical terms, and avoidjargon.Another resource isThe Economist Style Guide, available athttp://www.economist.com/styleguide/introduction.GETTING ASSISTANCEHere are some great resources for getting assistance on the writing assignments. See the course webpage in the Writing Assignments folder for information on WAtutorials and assistance prior to the deadline for each WA. Each college has a writing centre. You can book an appointment athttp://www.writing.utoronto.ca/writing-centres/arts-and-science. The teaching approachof these centres is described athttp://www.writing.utoronto.ca/writing-centres/learning. For those students whose first language in not English, the English Language Learningprogram (ELL) athttp://www.artsci.utoronto.ca/current/advising/ell is an awesomeresource. Check to see what is available this Fall; there will certainly be offerings foryou to consider for the F/W semester when you will likely face other writingassignments. Other resources are accessible from this site. More than 60 Advice files on all aspects of academic writing are available fromwww.writing.utoronto.ca/advice.o Note in particular “How Not to Plagiarize” and other advice on documentationformat and methods of integrating sources; these are listed in the section atwww.writing.utoronto.ca/advice/using-sources.

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